final post photo 1 photo 2 photo 3

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Auguste Rodin

AMICO_DALLAS_103842681 AMICO_DALLAS_103842686 AMICO_SAN_FRANCISCO_103844591 LESSING_ART_10310751523 LESSING_ART_10310752668

I just had to…

I just had to...

I just had to…

Finished: John the Baptist

Finished: John the Baptist

Finished: John the Baptist

Finished: John the Baptist

Finished: John the Baptist

Finished: John the Baptist

Subject vs. Content : John the Baptist

“John the Baptist.” Teddy bear, wire, cardboard, electrical cords, plastic. Feb. 2014

                This installation has the base of a large, decapitated teddy bear. A slanted wooden table has been inserted inside of him, allowing him to stand. Upon his back lay a cardboard box, a red plastic door, and flowers, all connected with wire, both electrical and metal.

                Although the assemblage has two interpretations, as the artist I would preferably combine the two. According to the title of the piece, “John the Baptist,” is to be read as a religious commentary. I have always loved the subject of John the Baptist and other biblical decapitation subjects in paintings. Most representations show a victor with a decapitated head, like Salome, David, or Judith. But what the subjects often leave out, is the body. “John the Baptist” relates the crudeness of decapitation as martyrdom; the infinito of a missing head, the exposed naked body, entrails and excrements.

                Another interpretation could be sexual frustration. Stress has been made to assert the assemblage as an ithyphallic structure (whatever that structure might be). The removal of the head, and emphasis on “another head,” represents an absence of humanity, further emphasized by the complete loss of humanity, in that the figure is comprised of trash. Influenced by Mike Kelly, the sexual undertones shockingly come from children’s’ play toys; again creating a confusing sexual tension the viewer must contemplate for themselves.

                “John the Baptist” should really be read as a combination of a religious martyrdom and sexual frustration. The glorified, ithyphallic altar and nostalgia of children’s toys should create an uneasiness and tension.   

assemblage piece: “John the Baptist”

assemblage piece: “John the Baptist”

assemblage piece: “John the Baptist”

assemblage piece: “John the Baptist”